Archive for the 'Law' Category

09
Mar
10

Indian Indentured Migration to the Caribbean by Steven Vertovec

The abolishment of slavery and the emancipation of th slave population marked a turning point in the history of the West Indies. The British government passed the Act of Emancipationin 1833 and declared it law in the following year., freeing a slave population of around 665 000 in the British Carribbean… see more here

15
Sep
09

Aapravasi Ghat

The Aapravasi Ghat Trust Fund was set up by an Act of Parliament in 2001 with the main objectives to establish and promote Aapravasi Ghat as a national, regional and international memorial site, set a museum at Aapravasi Ghat, create public awareness in the history of the site and depict the arrival, settlement and evolution of the immigrants in Mauritius. It also has to identify and acquire sites, buildings and structures linked with the history of the arrival of immigrants and promote the social and cultural aspects of Aapravasi Ghat.

14
Sep
09

Indentured Labour in the British Empire, 1834-1920

The West Indies and Indentured Labour Migration – the Jamaican Experience
by

William A. Green

14
Aug
09

Indentured Indian Workers in Mauritius, Natal and Fiji

Indentured Indian Workers in Mauritius, Natal and Fiji

By Ravinder K. Thiara

published in

The Cambridge survey of world migration

08
Aug
09

Chapter from Imperial Connections

By Thomas Metcalf

Hard Hands Sound Bodies

02
Sep
08

Indians Overseas

Indians Overseas

By

P. Jodanda Rao- 1944

Is a senior member of the Servants of India Society. This speech and
paper comes out of his travels in countries where Indians had settled. This paper provides an interesting insight into contemporary 1940’s Indians views on Diasporic Indian communities.

08
Aug
08

Labouring under the Law: Gender and the Legal Administration of Indian Immigrants under Indenture in Colonial Natal, 1860-1907

Labouring under the Law: Gender and the Legal Administration of Indian Immigrants under Indenture in Colonial Natal, 1860-1907

By

Nafisa Essop Sheik

This study is a gendered historical analysis of the legal administration of Indian Immigrants in British Colonial Natal in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By focusing primarily on the attempts of the Natal Government to intervene in the personal law of especially indentured and ex-indentured Indians, this thesis presents an analysis of the role that gender played in the conceptualization and promulgation of the indentured labour scheme in Natal, and in the subsequent regulation of the lives of Indian immigrants in the Colony. It traces the developments in the administration of Indian women, especially, from the beginning of the indenture system in colonial Natal until the passage of the Indian Marriages Bill of 1907 and attempts to contextualize arguments around these themes within broader colonial discourses and debates, as well as to examine the particularity of such administrative attempts in the Natal context. This study observes the changing nature of ‘custom’ amongst Indian immigrants and the often simultaneous and contradictory attempts of the Natal colonial administration to at first support, and later, to intervene in what constituted the realm of the customary. Through an analysis of legal administration at different levels of government, this analysis considers the interactions of gender and utilitarian legal discourse under colonialism and, in particular, the complex role of Indian personal law and the ordinary civil laws of the Colony of Natal in both restricting and facilitating the mobility of Indian women brought to Natal under the auspices of the indentured labour system.